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Arch Craniofac Surg > Volume 14(2); 2013 > Article
Archives of Craniofacial Surgery 2013;14(2):111-114.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.7181/acfs.2013.14.2.111   
Reduction and Fixation Methods for Fractured Anterior Maxillary Sinus Wall Using Suture Tie.
Hyun Gyo Jeong, Jae Kyoung Kang, Jung Kook Song, Myoung Soo Shin, Byung Min Yun
1Jeong Hyun Gyo Aesthetic Plastic Clinic, Seoul, Korea.
2Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Jeju National University College of Medicine, Jeju, Korea. almostfree@hanmail.net
3Department of Preventive Medicine, Jeju National University College of Medicine, Jeju, Korea.
Abstract
The anterior maxillary sinus walls are the most frequently injured sites in midfacial fractures. The maxillary sinus is a difficult surgical site for reduction and fixation due to its narrow surgical field, and has a chance of developing sinusitis when sufficient treatment is not given. In this study, the methods developed by the authors for managing such are introduced. Two small openings were made on both sides of the fracture line, then a suture knot was tied instead of wiring for reduction and fixation. Then an absorbable mesh was applied on top of the fracture site, with a suture knot for additional fixation. This method was applied on an actual patient, and it was a convenient method despite the narrow surgical field that was provided. The authors believe that using suture knots to fixate fractured segments and absorbable mesh is relatively convenient and economically efficient when it comes to the reduction and fixation of the maxillary sinus wall fracture with several fragments.
Keywords: Reduction; Fixation; Maxillary sinus; Suture tie


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